A Crocodile yarn. Should you be concerned about getting eaten by one in Northern Australia?

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“A dark moonless night followed and being absolutely bushed from a long day on the road we fall asleep lulled by the sound of bush crickets and silence.

Until……..

Splash, splash, splash, splash in the water. Really loud.”

The tales of Crocodile attacks in Australia are just spine chilling. A crocodile is a predator and a man-eater and when travelling in Northern Australia you should always BE CROC AWARE.  Not afraid, just aware. Especially in regions that Saltwater Crocodiles inhabit.

A large crocodile, up to 6 metres long, can make himself invisible in knee deep muddy water and remain under for an hour without even a ripple to indicate his presence. He is the ultimate master of stillness – until the right moment. The ultimate ambush reptile. He explodes from the water with ferocity and aggression and if need be he can jump to take prey two metres above the surface. He is quick and deadly and the prey in his enormous jaws will be subjected to the ‘crocodile roll’ which is almost certain to be fatal.

Australian author, Hugh Edwards book, “Crocodile Attack in Australia” contains stories of attacks in Australia that are both fascinating and absolutely horrifying. They all happened in the blink of an eye and not surprisingly a lot of those fatally attacked were locals who should have known better. Locals have a habit of getting blase. The ‘she’ll be right attitude’ just doesn’t cut the mustard in Northern Australia waterways though.

I write this blog to re-count a tale of our own, just as warning.  We laugh about it now as we re-tell this yarn but after reading Hugh Edwards book it sits a little uncomfortably with me, although it gets bigger and better with every telling.

In 2005, Kevin and I, with our three young boys did the monumental road trip along the Savannah Way, from Cairns, QLD to Broome, WA. It was and still is the ultimate Australian adventure drive. Remote, a lot of kilometres on dirt roads and the scenery right through Queensland, The Top End of The Territory and The Kimberley’s in Western Australia is simply stunning. Blue skies, ancient landscape, stunning waterfalls, gorges and waterholes, red dusty roads and big remote distances.

Our philosophy for this trip was “keep it simple”. No fancy caravan or camper trailer for our party of five.  Just our 4WD Landcruiser stacked with boxes, an Engel fridge and five swags rolled up on the roof rack. What a sight we were at camp. Five swags in a line between two trees, a rope extending between the trees and 5 bright orange and blue mosquito nets tucked around each swag. We sure attracted attention and created a few laughs.

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The photo quality is bad but you get the idea. The simple, dag family…….

We tend to free camp a lot when we travel and like to be away from civilisation.  Between Burketown in The Gulf Country to Borroloolla in the Northern Territory we travelled the very remote and rough Carpentaria Highway. Why its called a highway is beyond me. At times its nothing more than a two wheel track with a many river crossings. The 500 odd kilometres takes over 15 hours.

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The Carpentaria HIGHWAY. Definitely unique to Australia. Slow going but a great 4WD drive.

We decide to stop overnight half way across and we always like to camp by a watercourse if its safe. There’s just something really nice about camping by a creek or river with a campfire and maybe a refreshing swim when its hot.

So late afternoon, after many dusty slow hours of punishing dirt, we come to the Robinson River Aboriginal community.  As we cross the causeway over the river, despite a crocodile warning sign,  there are a couple of adults with young Aboriginal children frolicking and splashing in the water.

Kevin winds down the window and asks if there is anywhere we can camp for the night.  They are very friendly and give us directions to follow a track to the right. “Don’t go left – big crocs that way”.

So, we find a lovely camp along a shallow tributary. Crystal clear shallow water and we all have a paddle to wash off the dust and travelling grime.2004 Kimberley photos 033

We prepare camp in the usual way by lining up all our swags in a row on the shallow bank of the creek, only a couple of metres from the water with Kevin at one end and me at the other. The three boys in their mini swags in the middle. The mighty sacrifices parents make for their off spring. Get eaten first.

A dark moonless night followed and being absolutely bushed from a long day on the road we fall asleep lulled by the sound of bush crickets and silence.

Until……..

Splash, splash, splash, splash in the water. Really loud.

We all wake up instantly. What the heck was that? Kevin has the torch by his head and shines it quickly over the creek.  We see nothing. “I think its just the fish arking up” says Kevin. Back to sleep again. Well a tentative sleep with me. I’m thinking about being stalked by yowies or bush pigs or Mick from Wolf Creek. Finally I doze off.

Then a while later a furious SPLASH, SPLASH,  SPLASH, SPLASH……….

On goes the torch again frantically searching in the pitch black for the culprit.

We see nothing in the placid , calm, peaceful creek.

This happened all night long.  It set us on edge although the boys zonked out.

In the morning its all cheery sunshine again as we pack up and we just brush off the weird goings on of the night before as a glitch.

As luck would have it, as we went to hit the road, Kevin discovered we had one dead flat tyre.  A bit of messing around for us and a couple of the boys were getting antsy, so we gave them a two way UHF radio and said go and explore up the creek a little bit while we change it.

Next thing Kevin gets a call on the radio. “Hey Dad, are there crocodiles in this creek?”

“No, Why?”

“Because there is one in front of us”

“Come back RIGHT NOW!”

YIKES. We slept on the bank in swags, exposed, in crocodile country.  The splashing during the night was possibly the crocodile going up and down the creek.

Kevin went to meet the boys and when they showed him the spot, the crocodile was gone, so we don’t know if it was the saltwater or freshwater variety. But as close as we are to the Gulf of Carpentaria it was highly likely a saltie. Way too close for comfort but I didn’t give it too much thought.

However, when we got to Broome, we bought the book. Hugh Edwards “Crocodile Attack in Australia”. Oh dear, that opened my eyes a whole lot more.croc attack book

Were we croc aware? Well yes, in a way. We live in Cairns. We asked the locals first and got the all clear.  However there are rules to camping in Northern Australia in crocodile country. They are as follows…..

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  • Observe the warning signs as they are there for a reason (yes, they were on the causeway)
  • Seek local or expert advise before swimming, camping, fishing or boating ( well, we did do that)
  • There is a potential danger anywhere saltwater crocodiles occur.  If there is any doubt do not swim, canoe or use small boats. (Fail, we all had a paddle in the knee deep water)
  • Be aware. Keep your eyes open for large crocodiles and keep small children and pets away from the waters edge (gulp!)
  • Do not paddle, camp, clean fish or prepare food at the waters edge. (gulp again!)
  • Do not return daily or regularly to the same spot. Crocodiles are smart and they will be watching for a pattern.
  • Do not lean over the waters edge or stand on logs overhanging the water (remember they can jump)

And be aware that Saltwater crocodiles don’t only live in salt water. They can live hundreds of miles from the coast in freshwater lagoons and waterways and especially in freshwater swamps.

So there you have it. That was the night we were stalked and almost eaten by a reptilian monster. (Told you its gets bigger with every telling). But we all lived by the skin of our teeth to ride camels along Cable Beach in Broome.2004 Kimberley photos 132

Anyhow the moral of the story is ‘be croc aware’ in Northern Australia. Just because you can’t see them doesn’t mean they can’t see you and even innocent mistakes can land you in a whole lot of strife.  Don’t be too worried or afraid though. Its perfectly safe to travel and enjoy the North of our wonderful country as long as you observe the rules.

We have travelled and swum in exquisite waterholes all over Northern Australia but only where we know its safe to swim. Its actually rare to sight a crocodile and when you do its exciting (from a safe distance high up the bank of course.)

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Our boys high on the bank watching a monster Saltie. It was enormous. Very exciting to see.

We learnt a lesson on that trip.  Now we don’t sleep in swags on the banks of waterways in the North.  Just in case………..

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Joel sitting in the playground in Broome, reading the Crocodile Attack book. Yes, its that good

This stunning place is Sir John Gorge in the Kimberley. Yes we had a gorgeous swim here. No croc signs and perfectly safe. There are so many wonderful places like this along the Savannah Way. No need to risk it anywhere there are crocodile warning signs.

Diamantina National Park – Adventurers only read on…..

“The sky forms vivid pastel layers and the gorge glows a soft orange. Pelicans with their great wing span glide serenely over the water. Everything becomes still and gentle. This is outback Australia at her finest and its magnificent.”

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Diamantina National Park is remote. Draw a rough diamond on a map between Winton, Boulia, Birdsville and Windorah in Outback Queensland and Diamantina is roughly in the middle; in the middle of nowhere to be precise. It’s the catchment region for the Diamantina River in the heart of the mighty channel country and until 1992 was a former pastoral holding.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The flat, treeless black soil plains that surround the National Park hold many perils for the 4WD enthusiast if it rains.  Even small amounts of rain can make the roads impassable. The wet black soil is treacherous and will suck you down to the bowels of the earth, or at the very least to your mudguards. National Parks advise that all travellers must be self sufficient, prepared for emergencies, carry an EPIRB, extra fuel and be aware the campground is exposed and has few shade trees.

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Add a dash of rain and this drive would be a whole different kettle of fish

As uninspiring as all this sounds, we were drawn to the Diamantina in July 2015, or more appropriately, lured by a siren song.  Australian folk singer, John Williamson is responsible for that. His version of ‘Diamantina Drover’ has always been one of our favourites and it inspired an intense longing to visit a region immortalised so eloquently in folk song.  It’s a song about droving days gone by at Old Cork Station where the rain never falls on that dusty Diamantina.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

With a few different options available to enter the National Park, we chose the 306km Winton route, specifically so we could go via the ruins of Old Cork Station and pay homage to those droving ghosts of days long gone. We passed the occasional red sand dune on the drive in, an indication of our close proximity to the Simpson Desert. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAYou must be totally self sufficient and its rough but there is a free camping area behind the ruins on the muddy banks of the Diamantina River.  It’s in the dirt, its parched dry and the river is the muddy brown of all our inland rivers but it has a romantic allure with a windmill providing the opportunity for a classic Australian sunset photo. The feeling of isolation was absolute and the ruins proved to be fascinating to explore.

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Old Cork Station ruins. Makes you wonder about a time long gone…..
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Love a classic Australian windmill.

It’s only a relatively short distance from Old Cork Station to the entrance of Diamantina National Park, where the landscape continues to hide its secrets. There is literally nothing from horizon to horizon. It’s this in itself which makes the drive ‘something’ to experience. The third year of an extended drought ensured that we encountered little more than vast expanses of bull dust and dry parched earth. We could see how only a little bit of rain would change the conditions instantly though.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After passing through the park ranger station it was a further 10km before we set up camp at Hunters Gorge Campground on the banks of the caramel coloured Diamantina River.

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Hunters Gorge campground. It doesn’t look like much on arrival but it sure grows on you.

The harsh midday sun drains the colour from the landscape. It’s stark, harsh and almost lifeless and our initial impression was misleading. Only the 1.5 billion flies take great delight in making their presence known; in your eyes, up your nose, in your ears and they even accompany you on a visit to the single pit toilet. Any orifice will do. Okay, that was a bit tongue in cheek, but I’m sure you get the picture. The flies were bad to the extent that even Kevin for the first time ever in all our years of bush travel succumbed to the almighty ‘fly net’.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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Flies. What flies?

This place is, however, incredibly special. When the sun sinks low on the horizon at sunset and sunrise, Diamantina National Park is spectacular. The buzzing of flies diminishes and only a gentle chorus of birdsong breaks the quietude. The features of the landscape start to soften and the hues of colour are stunning. The sky forms vivid pastel layers and the gorge glows a soft orange. Pelicans with their great wing span glide serenely over the water. Everything becomes still and gentle. This is outback Australia at her finest and its magnificent.

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The lovely Diamantina River

So, we find it hard to leave this stunning place. We extend our stay and we learn to live with the landscape. During the day when the sun is merciless and the flies congregate in masses we ‘siesta’ and read in the safe confines of our fly-screened Trayon camper. At dusk we drink in and savour the beauty and the complete solitude. At night we prepare the campfire for a phenomenal starry night sky that defies comprehension and then we sleep to the eerie tune of distant dingo howls.  At dawn we rise early to appreciate the coolness, the stillness, the pastel shades in the sky and the mirror reflections on the water.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

So, is it worthwhile to go out of your way to visit this remote National Park in Outback Queensland?  If you are into adventure and solitude where people are few, the landscape is vast and only 4WD vehicles dare to tread, absolutely it is.

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A lone campground tree that deserves a photo.
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We love the layering of the layers in the sky. Its worth braving the chill and climbing a hill at sunrise for the view.

After visiting Diamantina National Park I recommend a visit to Boodjamulla National Park. Yeah it’s a long drive but that goes with Outback Queensland and Lawn Hill Gorge is an absolute oasis. Read my blog Just what is it about Lawn Hill Gorge?

Coral Coast of WA: Quobba and Red Bluff (waves and whales)

A SNAPSHOT INTO A LIFE WE WILL NEVER HAVE.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The coastline here is no longer protected by Ningaloo Reef and its wild. The swells smashing into the rock ledges are enormous, scary and impressive. Tonnes of angry, foaming white water smashing ferociously into the rock walls sending cascading plumes high into the air. It sounds like thunder and this is so not the place to do a bit of fishing from the rocky shelves. Plaques are left here as memorials to those who valued a fish over their own lives. They dared and lost because KING WAVES KILL. An enormous sign tells us so. The blowholes were amazing. The pressure of the incoming swells created quite a spectacular explosion, especially a really big wave.20604631_2004026863149505_4737760012829499236_n

We are at Quobba Station blowholes – a 137 odd kilometre coastal road detour just north of Carnarvon. Our destination was Red Bluff, a surfers paradise, to camp a little bit remote for a couple of days.

Following the narrow dirt track along the coastline we were so excited by the sight of so many humpback whales frolicking close to the shore. Red Bluff attracts local surfers drawn by the magnificent rolling swell on the point. This is the wild West Australian coastline. Clear, deep, cold water with huge waves that roll onto the beach in sets. They tower over the locals who frolic in them. This is their turf. They know the conditions. Not us. We don’t want to get pummelled and it’s too cold anyway. As each wave crashes into the shore it sounds like a cannon being fired. Awe inspiring and very majestic with the red bluff as a backdrop.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe camping here is totally unique. $15 per person per night camping and very rustic. Certainly, different than touristy Cape Range National Park but then this is a haven for surfers. I love this place because it gives us a snapshot into a different life. The life of growing up in Western Australia where your life revolves around the ocean (let’s face it; there is absolutely nothing inland.) A life where you are at home in the huge rolling surf that doesn’t faze you in the least and the bounty of the sea is yours to pillage. We chat to a young surfer dude. He camps simple; a swag next to his car, cooking squid stir fry for tea from the back of his 4WD with a squid he just caught, wetsuit hanging over a tree after a day spent catching the curling swells on his board. It’s a life we envy (especially Kevin) but us or our children will never have. Kevin surfed in South Australia when he was younger; some of the best times in his life. So, he’s drooling with envy. I’m so glad we took this little detour. It was touch and go but we figured while we are here we should. We are richer for the experience for sure.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Red Bluff is exposed to the cold August wind but we enjoyed it immensely. The raw power of the Indian Ocean is quite a sight to behold and the sunset was pretty damn magnificent. I know we always rave about the sunsets in WA but this one was particularly impressive with the spray from the cascading waves as part of the equation.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Kimberley, WA – all about the Gibb River Road.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAShe’s in her bikini, thigh deep in the Pentecost River – not that far down from where it joins the Cambrian Gulf which is the domain of absolute monster estuarine crocodiles. Meanwhile Kevin and I, a bit further along the bank, tie a rope onto our bucket and chuck it into the river from high on the bank to scoop some water out for our dishes. There’s no way we are going near that water. Not after our episode at Douglas Hot Springs ( Aussies behaving badly: Our adventure at Douglas Hot Springs )

It’s a car load of adventurous European backpackers and we are all being ‘slippery gypsies’ free camping at the Pentecost River Crossing on the Gibb River Road. I say to her “you’re brave” and she replies with “it’s okay, I can’t see any crocodiles”. Oh dear. Their naivety is delightful but then she didn’t get munched so all good. We saw a croc the next day so they were definitely in there.

Our campsite on the Pentecost River

In the morning I say to Kevin, “this is priceless” and he agrees. We have just cooked bacon, eggs and naan bread toast on the BBQ plate over a small campfire and eat in the sunshine on the bank of the Pentecost River in the beautiful light of a cool Kimberley morning. This is good.

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Sunrise on the Pentecost River
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Ready to cook breakfast

I admit we were a little ‘jaded’ with the El Questro experience at the start of the Eastern end of the Gibb River Road. Its bitumen all the way to the turn off now and too easily accessible by the masses. I swam in icy cold Emma Gorge by myself, as we were the first early birds there, and it was just delightful, however, Zebedee Hot Springs and El Questro Gorge were just ridiculous with the volume of people. (although the scenery is worth it).

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The stunning Emma Gorge at El Questro. An icy cold swim ticked off the bucket list.

This is our third time across the Gibb River Road and we got to see it 28 years ago when it was totally ‘uncommercialised’. We had to pump diesel out of a 44-gallon drum at Mt Barnett to refuel and the road was little more than a rough track. It’s much busier now, the road is badly corrugated in places but a lot wider than back then. Initially we thought it was less of an adventure than our honeymoon trip in 1989 BUT THEN for the first time ever we turned onto the Kalumbaru Road and headed north to Mitchell Plateau. Crikey. The road was savage with corrugations as big as speed humps.  Now that’s definitely an adventure.

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Kalumbaru Road Corrugations (for 260km)

It took us a brutal bone shattering six hours to travel 230km from the Kalumbaru turn-off to the Mitchell Falls campground. So why do it you may ask. Is it really worth it? Well, yeah.  Mitchell Falls were the most awe- inspiring, magnificent, totally gob smackingly WOW. The sight of them in full glory while we perched on the edge of a steep cliff after walking for 2 hours was something to see.

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A photo just can’t do Mitchell Falls justice. An awe inspiring sight when you are there.
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After the grandeur of Mitchell Falls, the lovely Mertens Falls made a lovely lunch spot and a refreshing swim followed.

If you look where we are on a map, remote is an understatement.  We saviour this remoteness by spending a couple more nights camped beside the gorgeous King Edward River where we swim and have a canoe adventure where we try to get our inflatable to ride the rapids (Kevin fell in).

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Paddling on the King Edward River

Then we face the horrendous corrugations back down again. Kevin was exhausted from the serious concentration required skating over the road but it’s a small price to pay to experience such amazing scenery. No major issues with the car which was great: a few more rattles and the tray bolts were loose (despite nylock nuts) but no flat tyres. The car has been an absolute champion and performed admirably under very trying conditions.

The Western end of the Gibb River Road is in much better condition than the Eastern end with the bonus that there is more to see –  gorgeous gorges and swimming at regular intervals (Manning, Galvans, Adcock, Bell and Windjana: all different). We free camp at Barnett River Gorge which was an absolute gem and free camp (a little sneakily) along a creek near beautiful Bell Gorge.

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Gorgeous swimming and waterfall at Bell Gorge

Mornington Wilderness Camp, 90 km off the Gibb River Road, was a must see. Kevin made me to drive in and I went through a couple of water crossings (over the bonnet and up to the windscreen). Okay, I exaggerate – just a little…..

Dimond Gorge is really remote and so dramatic. We paddle down the tranquil Fitzroy River where it cuts through the King Leopold Ranges. The sandstone gorge walls are contorted from long ago earth movements and ancient (up to 1.8 – 2 billion years old – mind boggling). It really was so stunning and we both commented on how at that moment in time how we were the wealthiest people in the whole world.

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Pumping up our boat at Dimond Gorge. We refuse to pay $70 to hire one.
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Lovely Dimond Gorge which we had all to ourselves
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Just as beautiful Sir John Gorge at Mornington Wilderness Park
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Dimond Gorge paddle picnic lunch

The Gibb River Road is not about driving the road itself, it’s about the extraordinarily special scenery it leads you too. You need to travel the corrugations, do the hard yards, make like a mountain goat at times, swim under the waterfalls and see, hear, feel and touch the landscape. Soak it up. Touch the soul and feel the heartbeat of The Kimberley. I do love it so. We both do. We did it all.

So how do we feel after 7 weeks and 6800km on the road living in a 2m x 2m box on the back of a ute? Pretty good. Naturally we have days where we feel weary, worn out and dirty, however, then we have another ‘magic’ moment to remind us why we are out here. A night sky, a sunset, a magical piece of scenery.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There are so many magic ‘wow’ moments, every day is different with a sense of anticipation and most importantly we laugh a lot. After coming all the way across the top of the country we are definitely tired and gorged, waterfalled and rough roaded out a bit now though. Its ‘slip into Broome time’ mode coming up and we have every intention of chilling out for a decent break around Broome to recharge the depleted batteries (and possibly splurging just a little with the savings we made by free camping).

Fish’n’chips on Cable Beach. Bring it on……..

A few random photos below

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Good idea not to bring the van on the Gibb River Road. It just might not make it…………
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This is the Prestons avoiding camp fees and making free camping a fine art form. 
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Beautiful Barnett River Gorge. Another great camp and delicious swim.
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Crocodiles at Wandjina Gorge
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Ancient Devonian Coral Reef at Wandjina Gorge
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Free camping at the RAAF Quarry (its in the camps 9 book but we thought the sign suited us down to a tee)

Just what is it about Lawn Hill Gorge?

“Lawn Hill Gorge has ‘it’. Precisely what ‘it’ is I’m not sure how to put into words. I guess it’s like trying to explain what colours are to a blind person. It’s just something you need to experience yourself or it has no meaning.”

From Leichhardt Falls we take the shorter route via Augusta Downs Stations and join the Gregory Development Road to the Gregory Pub. After a delightful swim in the Gregory River its only 100km further on to Boodjamulla National Park and Lawn Hill Gorge.

The first 65 odd km to the Century Mine turn off used to be great because it was well maintained for the numerous trucks going in and out of the mine. However now the mine has closed and the layer of seal is pot holed and disintegrating rapidly. Makes for an interesting ride dodging from one side of the road to the other avoiding mega pot holes. The last 15km into the National Park is badly corrugated dirt but the camp ground is full of caravans so it did not obviously deter them.

We always stay at the Boodjamulla National Park campground. Adeles Grove Caravan Park 10km away is very shady with green grass on the banks of Lawn Hill creek. Its lovely if your stay is all about the camping, nice facilities and a restaurant but we come here to hike, canoe and swim in the pristine waters of the Gorge and all this action starts at the National Park campground. Its dry and sparse with cold water showers but is nice and quiet. No generators allowed and only 20 sites that must be pre-booked online if you want to snag a spot in peak season.

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Our camp site at Boodjamulla National Park

Now about Lawn Hill Gorge. Some places just have that ‘wow’ factor. I’m hoping to see a few of them on this extended trip but on this occasion, we chose to start our adventure with a known ‘wow’ spot just to kick it off nicely. This is our sixth visit here.

Lawn Hill Gorge has ‘it’. Precisely what ‘it’ is I’m not sure how to put into words. I guess it’s like trying to explain what colours are to a blind person. It’s just something you need to experience yourself or it has no meaning.

In the words of John Denver, it just ‘fills up my senses’.  Visually it is striking. The colours mixed together on an outback palette create something quite extraordinary.  The water in Lawn Hill Creek is a deep jade green due to the calcium carbonate content. The gorge is ochre red and against a brilliant blue outback sky it is beautiful. I can never take a photo that does it justice.

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The water is genuinely this gorgeous shade of jade green

My favourite place at Lawn Hill is in the middle of the gorge, drifting aimlessly in the canoe in the late afternoon shade and just taking it all in.  The canoe traffic has vanished for the day make it a place of complete solitude. The water is still and reflections are mirrored on the surface. The silence is complete. Only on occasion, you hear a willy wagtail chirrup or a corella squawk by or the gentle lapping of water on the canoe. It is so unbelievably peaceful.

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The middle of the main Gorge where Boodjamulla the rainbow serpent dwells

The swimming in the green water is just absolutely delicious despite the presence of freshwater crocodiles. They won’t bother you if you don’t bother them. We don’t even know they are there unless we spot one sun baking on a log as we canoe past.

We think its essential to bring your own canoe to Lawn Hill. They can be hired from Adeles Grove but its quite expensive and only available during the day. We bring our own ‘Sevylor’ inflatable. It packs up quite small and gives us the freedom to canoe to our hearts content, including sunrise and at night (that was a bit hairy). That way you can take photos like this.

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A sunrise canoe is just magnificent as the first rays of sunshine touch the gorge walls
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Our inflatable canoe is just perfect to carry on a long trip. Takes 5 minutes to pump up by hand and folds up quite small.

So our three days here have, as usual, have been just so lovely. Mostly swimming, canoeing and relaxing as the weather was very warm still and swimming in that divine water is just a heavenly experience. Hard to leave but this time is different as we are not homeward bound.

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Beautiful swimming

Its time for us to turn left and head for the Northern Territory border. Exciting days to come. Lorella Springs Wilderness Park and Limmen Bight National Park next and this is a wild and remote part of the Northern Territory (complete with natural hot springs).